Robert (Bob) LeDonne will be remembered for his ceramics, metal sculptures and inventive spirit.

The internationally known Colorado Springs artist died Jan. 21. He was 76. He's survived by his partner, Alice Mayfield.

A celebration of life will be held from 4-8 p.m. March 4 at the Bridge Gallery, 218 W. Colorado Ave. A retrospective of his work will be on display from March 4-31.

"He was a thoughtful friend and generous with his information," said artist and Bridge Gallery co-owner Deena Bennett. "He was really creative. He used glazes and combined throwing and hand-built work into one piece. I've never seen anybody do the type of work he did, and it was totally intuitive on his part."

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Robert (Bob) LeDonne, an internationally-known and collected Colorado Springs artist and inventor, died Jan. 21. He was 76. He will be remembered for his ceramics, metal sculptures and inventive spirit. A celebration of life will be held from 4-8 p.m. March 4 at the Bridge Gallery, 218 W. Colorado Ave. A retrospective of his work also will be on display from March 4-31. Courtesy 

LeDonne's work has been collected globally, as well as shown and sold in many Colorado Springs galleries, including the Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center at Colorado College. His work also resides in the permanent collections at Kirkland Museum of Fine and Decorative Art and Colorado History Museum in Denver.

The Colorado native, who was born in Oak Creek, graduated from Grand Junction High School and attended Mesa Junior College, now Colorado Mesa University, in Grand Junction and Colorado State University in Fort Collins. He spent many years living in California, working as a photographer and TV cameraman, before relocating to the Springs 25 years ago. He also taught ceramics and other clay workshops around the country, including for the Colorado Potters Guild and the Business of Art Center, now Manitou Art Center, in Manitou Springs.

He developed a potter’s wheel and other equipment for people in wheelchairs, and had been granted two patents for a tactile sound system that draws a user into an audio and vibrational experience and helps them feel the audio signals.

"He was very gregarious," said Mayfield, his partner of more than two decades. "He always had a sense of humor with people he worked with. He did invent a few things he was never able to see come to fruition."

Contact the writer: 636-0270

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